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Waarom depositogarantie

The Dutch Deposit Guarantee is in place to protect account holders. In the unlikely event that a Dutch bank goes bankrupt, its account holders get their money back up to €100,000 per person.

What is a deposit?

A deposit is a sum of money you hold with your bank, for example in a payment account or a savings account.

What is deposit guarantee?

Deposit guarantee means that the money in your bank accounts is guaranteed up to €100,000, even if your bank goes bankrupt . Your money is automatically protected, from 1 cent up to €100,000.

Your money in the bank is protected

The Dutch Deposit Guarantee protects your money in Dutch bank accounts by law. On the Dutch government's behalf, the supervisory authority and central bank of the Netherlands, De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB), administers this protection. The government and DNB consider it important that people know their money is protected. This protection strengthens the stability of the economy and sustainable prosperity in the Netherlands.

Confidence and stability

If people no longer have confidence in the security of their money in the bank, a bank run can occur. If large numbers of account holders try to withdraw their money, even a healthy bank can get into trouble. In operating the deposit guarantee, the government ensures that account holders’ money is always safe up to €100,000 per person. This can prevent a bank run. If a bank goes bankrupt, the deposit guarantee allows account holders to regain access to their money quickly. They do not need to wait for the bank to be wound up. This protection strengthens the stability of the economy and sustainable prosperity in the Netherlands.

How does the deposit guarantee make its pay-outs?

All banks in the Netherlands pay contributions to fund the Dutch Deposit Guarantee. These contributions are added to the Deposit Guarantee Fund. This fund ensures that a failing bank's account holders can get their money back. Banks have contributed to the fund each quarter since 2016, so that enough money is available should a bank ever go bankrupt. The fund can ask all banks in the Netherlands for additional contributions if needed. This prevents the government from having to make up for any deficits.